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community engagement

The Fish Wars

This is a in-depth lesson plan put together about The Fish Wars of the 1960s and 70s between Indigenous nations and the states of Oregon and Washington, in which the state governments violated the treaty rights of native people and unconstitutionally barred their access to fishing. This is a great resources for educators and students to learn about The Fish Wars and the rights of Native American sovereign nations. For more read here.

A Red Deal

This articles introduces the idea of a “Red New Deal” that ties Indigenous liberation into a demand for sweeping environmental changes. The author also reviews how New Deal economic development relied on the displacement of Indigenous communities from their homes and the destruction of their land. They suggest that policymakers must learn from the consequences of past policies and must choose to center indigenous voices in the new environmental movement. For more read here.

Decolonizing Environmental Education

This is a Zine put together that can be used as a tool to begin the work of changing and decolonizing the field of environmental education. The Zine shares personal experiences of POC and Indigenous environmental educators and activists, provides links to numerous articles and resources and offers tools on how to call for systemic environmental justice. For more read here.

The stifling air of rigid radicalism

This article discusses the pitfalls of “rigid radicalism”, which is defined both as a “fixed way of being” and a “way of fixing” that views emerging movements for their flaws. The author provides a reminder that radicalism is not a fixed way of being, rather a constantly evolving creative process. For more read here.

Greening Without Gentrification

This article discusses how the development of parks in low-income neighborhoods can accelerate or begin the process of gentrification and contribute the displacement of low-income residents. The authors discuss the results of a study on “parks-related anti-displacement strategies” and provide examples of how those engaged in park development are trying to prevent displacement of vulnerable groups. For more read here. 

Decolonization and anti-racism: a reading list

This is a reading list put together by Verso Books. In their words, this is a list of “books that challenge the notion of empire and offer a history of anti-colonial, anti-racist struggle.” To explore these book suggestions, read more here.