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intersectionality

Why We Need to Talk About—and Recognize—Representation Burnout

This article talks about the issue of “representation burnout”, the stress that comes from being the “only one” of a marginalized environment within a given space. The author writes that while the “first” person from a group to do something, such as the “first” Native American congresswoman, is often celebrated, we need to do more to honor the stress and vulnerability that comes from feeling alone in a space. For more read here.

Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education and Society

This journal has a number of publications, creative writing pieces and articles on the many aspects of decolonization work. For more read here.

Examining Equitable and Inclusive Work Environments in Environmental Education

This report explores how Environmental Education organizations are engaging in equity, diversity and inclusion practices and identifies strategies and tools on how to improve those practices. The study draws on research conducted with majority white organizational leaders and environmental educators of color and highlights a disconnect between those group’s perceptions of DEI work in their organizations. For more read here.

Decolonizing Environmental Education

This is a Zine put together that can be used as a tool to begin the work of changing and decolonizing the field of environmental education. The Zine shares personal experiences of POC and Indigenous environmental educators and activists, provides links to numerous articles and resources and offers tools on how to call for systemic environmental justice. For more read here.

What Does It Mean to Decolonize Design?

This article defines decolonization and offers suggestions on how those in the design industry can engage in decolonization practices through their work. The author also provides a list of resources for further reading on the subject. For more read here.

The business case for diversity is a sinking ship

This article offers a strong critique of the “business case” for diversity and inclusion, where increased profit is the main motivator for diversity efforts. The author details how companies are lauded for cosmetic changes, such as more diverse marketing strategies, while they fail to focus on more substantive, long-term changes to company practices, leadership and culture. They also address how DEI work primarily focused on profit fails to address the needs of the marginalized communities they seek to profit from. For more read here.