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ResourcesTitle Decoration

We believe that learning is essential to DEIJ work.

So we have pulled together a working archive of some of our favorite readings, activities, media and tips & tools. As we learn about and gather more resources, we will upload them here. You can filter by subject and then resource type below (activities, media, readings, tips & tools).

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Indigenous People and Borderlands

This resource provides a number of resources surrounding Indigenous people who live in international borderlands between the US and Mexico. It has resources that discuss the rights of Indigenous people who have been negatively impacted by US-Mexico immigration policies, the histories of Indigenous nations along the border and the settler-colonial paradigms that shape policy. For more read here.

The Fish Wars

This is a in-depth lesson plan put together about The Fish Wars of the 1960s and 70s between Indigenous nations and the states of Oregon and Washington, in which the state governments violated the treaty rights of native people and unconstitutionally barred their access to fishing. This is a great resources for educators and students to learn about The Fish Wars and the rights of Native American sovereign nations. For more read here.

The Great Land Robbery

This article offers an in-depth look at the history of dispossession of land of black farmers in the American South. It focuses on the story of one multi-generational family of black farmers to illustrate how racist policy and actions forced hundreds of thousands of black farmers off of their land during the 20th century. The author also addresses how policies leading to a lack of land ownership contributes to the significant wealth gap between white and and black families in America. For more read here.

A Red Deal

This articles introduces the idea of a “Red New Deal” that ties Indigenous liberation into a demand for sweeping environmental changes. The author also reviews how New Deal economic development relied on the displacement of Indigenous communities from their homes and the destruction of their land. They suggest that policymakers must learn from the consequences of past policies and must choose to center indigenous voices in the new environmental movement. For more read here.

White Supremacy Culture

This article offers definitions of culture, cultural racism and white supremacy culture that are helpful in understanding and clarifying the terms. For more read here.

Decolonizing Environmental Education

This is a Zine put together that can be used as a tool to begin the work of changing and decolonizing the field of environmental education. The Zine shares personal experiences of POC and Indigenous environmental educators and activists, provides links to numerous articles and resources and offers tools on how to call for systemic environmental justice. For more read here.

The stifling air of rigid radicalism

This article discusses the pitfalls of “rigid radicalism”, which is defined both as a “fixed way of being” and a “way of fixing” that views emerging movements for their flaws. The author provides a reminder that radicalism is not a fixed way of being, rather a constantly evolving creative process. For more read here.

What’s Missing From “White Fragility”

This article offers a critical look at Robin DiAngelo’s book, White Fragility and describes her experience attending one of Diangelo’s anti-racism workshops. The author discusses how the emerging field of whiteness studies acknowledges that whiteness and its power exists, but can fail to extend into more sustained antiracist action. For more read here.

When Fashion Gets Gender Wrong

This article discusses how fashion designers and clothing producers use the male body as a basis for “gender neutral” designs, making them not functionally “gender neutral” at all. The author explores this in the subset of techwear, but ties this into a broader trend to use male bodies as neutral. For more read here.

Conservation and Eugenics

This article provides an in-depth look at how eugenic thought was intertwined with the conservation movement and political leaders of the early 20th century, such as Theodore Roosevelt. The author seeks to understand this history and demonstrate how it affects contemporary environmentalism, such as through anti-immigration sentiments and concerns about curbing over-population. For more read here.